log  
logo
a Journal of Postdoctoral Research and Postdoctoral Affairs.
 
     Login   |   Register   
    ISSN : 2328-9791 Contact Us
left right
 
Journal of Postdoctoral Research (JPR) - Vol. 2 No. 3 March 2014
A new IPSEpro® library for the simulation of binary mixtures of real fluids in power cycle analysis
Maria E. Mondejar and Marcus Thern.


Many Roles of CCL20: Emphasis on Breast Cancer
Kingsley O. Osuala and Bonnie F. Sloane


Applications of Bases in Transition Metal Catalyzed Reactions
Zhao Yuan


QSAR Study of Thiophene-Anthranilamides Based Factor Xa Direct Inhibitors
Preetpal S Sidhu


Let There Be Light Activated Drug Release
Stephan C. Jahn


A Breakthrough Therapy in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: the Combination of Idelalisib and Rituximab
Yiming Zhong, Ta-Ming Liu, and Amy J Johnson


A Model Method for Studying Norovirus
Laura A. Adamson-Small


Extraction of phenolic compounds from crude pyrolysis oil
Arshad Adam Salema


New optogenetics tools to decipher the neuronal connectivity underlying behavior
Alfonso Martin-Peña



Author(s)
Maria E. Mondejar and Marcus Thern.

Address
Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Abstract: Increasing efforts to produce power from renewable resources and improve the efficiency of current industrial processes have turned the spotlight on organic Rankine cycles (ORC). The use of refrigerant mixtures in these cycles offers a wide range of possibilities for fluid selection and optimization. Moreover, zeotropic mixtures are reported to yield better cycle performances due to their better thermal match with the source and sink streams. In this work a new IPSEpro® library for the simulation of power cycles using binary mixtures was developed. With this library the working fluid can be defined as the mixture of any pair of suitable fluids contained in the Refprop database.

Author(s)
Kingsley O. Osuala and Bonnie F. Sloane

Address
Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
Abstract: CCL20 or MIP3[alpha] is a small '8 kDa protein primarily expressed in the liver, colon, prostate, cervix, and skin. The cellular receptor for CCL20 is CCR6. CCl20 unlike many other cytokines only binds CCR6, making the CCL20/CCR6 pathway an attractive drug target. Since the initial discovery of CCL20 in the early 1990's, there has been an increase in the evidence implicating the chemokine and its receptor in a number of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and human immunodeficiency virus infection. CCL20 has also been linked to malignancies such as ovarian, colorectal and pancreatic cancers. CCL20 can also attract tumor-promoting immune-suppressive cells to the tumor microenvironment, which may contribute to the immune evasive potential of the tumor and tumor progression.

Author(s)
Zhao Yuan

Address
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, FSU, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA
Abstract: Base is usually an empirical choice in transition metal catalyzed reactions. In this review, the application of bases in transition metal catalyzed reactions is described. The major aim is to show how various bases work, and from there, how we might optimize the reaction conditions by using different type of bases, according to the specific demands in transition metal catalyzed reactions.

Author(s)
Preetpal S Sidhu

Address
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UW, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
Abstract: QSAR studies were performed to understand the structure activity relationship (SAR) and to build the computational model to predict newer inhibitors with improved potency. In this study, a library of thiophene-anthranilamide based inhibitors of factor Xa was used to develop QSAR model. The library was divided into two sets: Training and Test sets. QSAR Model consists of four descriptors with R-square value of 0.80. Based on the statistical parameters, this model can be used to predict the newer inhibitors with improved pharmacological profile.

Author(s)
Stephan C. Jahn

Address
Department of Medicinal Chemistry and UF Health Cancer Center, UFL, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
Abstract: In some instances systemic drug delivery, either orally or intravenously, may not be the ideal dosing strategy. Repeated intravenous injections are unpleasant and sometimes a more localized delivery is needed such as in treatment of a tumor. A method that would allow a reservoir of drug to be implanted in a patient and be released in a controlled manner on demand would allow repeated dosing in a localized area and could prove extremely beneficial in the clinic by limiting the total dose needed and therefore the related side effects. The present article highlights a new approach utilizing reservoir capped by a light-responsive membrane that can be made permeable using an external near-infrared light source that was recently published by Timko et al.

Author(s)
Yiming Zhong, Ta-Ming Liu, and Amy J Johnson

Address
Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, OSU, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Abstract: In a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine 1, the combination of idelalisib and rituximab shows outstanding clinical activity as well as adequate safety in the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients.

Author(s)
Laura A. Adamson-Small

Address
Department of Pediatrics, UFL, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA
Abstract: Norovirus is an extremely contagious positive sense RNA virus responsible for gastroenteritis. It has gained media attention due to its presence and impact on food and drinking water, and in the cruise ship industry. Researchers studying Norovirus have faced many challenges in their field with a limited number of reagents available for detecting the virus and growing it in culture, and no dependable small animal model. This research highlight focuses on the work of Taube et al. in the development of a mouse model for human Norovirus. This study used BALB/c mice deficient in recombination-activating genes 1 and 2 (Rag) and common gamma chain (Yc) to demonstrate infection and replication of human Norovirus within the mice macrophages of the liver and spleen. They further showed the presence of human immune cells was not necessary to establish infection, but that the background strain of the mouse determined susceptibility. This discovery provides a huge step forward for basic and clinical applications of Norovirus research.

Author(s)
Arshad Adam Salema

Address
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Head Hall, UNB, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3, Canada
Abstract: Due to serious environmental problem and strict regulations to control pollution, researchers across the globe are putting their effort to find clean, renewable, greener and cost effective method to produce biochemical from biomass. The aim of this article was to highlight the method to extract phenolic compounds from crude pyrolysis oil using switchable hydrophilicity solvents (SHS). The pyrolysis oil was produced from softwood Kraft lignin through novel microwave pyrolysis process. The extraction efficiency of the method discussed in this article was about 95%. However, it was applied to small batch of pyrolysis oil (10 g). The highlight also presents the advantage and disadvantage of phenolic compound extraction methods including the recent study proposed by Fu et al., 2013.

Author(s)
Alfonso Martin-Peña

Address
Department of Neurology, McKnight Brain Institute, UFL, Gainsville, FL 32610, USA
Abstract: Optogenetic tools have revolutionized the field of neuronal physiology and behavior, however the low penetration power of blue lights through the cuticle of flies limited its use in this model. The development of red-shifted rhodopsins is breaking down that barrier.
 
     
btm
 
Click Here for Journal of Postdoctoral Affairs
top
 
btm

 
submit_article Submit Your Article
 
submit_article Post your Job
footer
 
 
home phone mail info@postdocjournal.com
 
twitter facebook social icon Social link You Tube sky
Click Here